What Would Happen if the Internet Destroyed All Other Media?

There’s been a lot of news recently regarding how much the internet is changing the face of media. Not only has BBC3 become the first TV channel to move entirely online, but The Indepentant announced that it would be going the same way, and people are already asking whether or not Britain’s newest newspaper, New Day, will survive in a digital age.

Not only did this make me wonder what would happen to the media industry if everything moved to being online, but also to the creative industry. Therefore, I decided to examine this possibility, and have listed the most likely changes that would happen for us creatives.

A World of Coders

I’ll start with the most obvious change; coding would become an essential skill for nearly all creatives. It’s thought that IT jobs will grow by 22% by 2020, and if more creative careers become anchored in the world wide web, knowing at least a little bit of HTML or CSS would become a priority.

Physical Products Become Upmarket

Predictably, as more people would become adjusted to digital tools, those who are traditionally skilled would become much rarer than digital creators. Therefore, traditional craftsmen would be able (and required) to charge more for their one-of-a-kind products, as well as focus on quality.

Digital Fundimentalism

Fundamentalism is a design-style that was extremely popular during the Modern Age that focused on geometry and ‘less is more’. Not only does this bring focus to the layout of a page, but it would be useful for reducing unnecessary data for a web-page. Therefore, geometric websites and brands in would most likely going to become the dominant aesthetic.

The Return of Retro

For every person who looks to the future, there’ll be one who’ll relish in the past. Therefore, there would most likely be a subculture of creatives who’d specialise in old-fashioned styles. Signs of this are already apparent, as the music-scene is shifting away from EDM into more folk-orientated sounds.

The Fall of Live Broadcasting

Almost every web-page has the option to leave a comment, so the chance to voice your opinion has never been easier. Not only that, but pre-recorded shows are easier to watch as more people become increasingly flexible with their daily routines. Putting both aspects into consideration, it would seem that live shows would most likely to decrease in viewership.

Rising Advertising Prices

Most things people expect to find online are free, so that would only leave advertising revenue as the way people to make money of their websites. Combined with the lack of space available on one page to market, adverts would most likely become more expensive.

More Aggressive Adverts

Another thing to consider is that unlike the old-days, we now have the ability to either hide static adverts, or skip video-adverts after their first 5 seconds. With this in mind, many advertising agencies would have to think about the even smaller time-span they have to get the brands they’re selling noticed.

Extreme Target Marketing

Unlike the older days, when TV shows were watched by family members of all ages, we’re seeing an increase in people using personal devices to watch their favourite shows. This means the family-market could decline, and brands would become more targeted towards specific demographics.

Is a Completely Online World a Good Thing or Bad Thing?

In all honesty, I don’t really think it’s fair to say whether or not a completely online world would be good or bad. Evolution brings both positive and negative effects to just about any kind of industry or society, and usually in equal measure.

The purpose of this post wasn’t to be a warning, neither was it to be a demand. it’s simply a nudge to suggest what could happen, and if so, how we should adapt out skills to fit into the changing environment.

Perhaps you think differently, though. You might think the creative industry might change in a different way, or you have an opinion as to whether it would be for better or worse. If so, feel free to comment about it below.