Top 10 Iconic Adobe Creative Cloud Apps

It shouldn’t be surprising to any of my friends that the highest standard in creative software packages is Adobe Creative Cloud. However, one thing I did find surprising was that when I searched for a list of the top 10 most iconic Creative Cloud Apps, I got no results.

So I thought, “what the hey”, and decided to write one myself.

I’m basing my list more on how well known they are outside of the design community than I am on how useful they actually are for the wide variety of creative products out there. With that said, their functionality will also play a big role in my decision-making, both individually and as part of the overall usage as part of the Adobe CC package.

No.10 – Muse

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Personally speaking, I’m not a huge fan of WYSIWYG website builders, mainly because I think they’re not everything they crack themselves up to be. With that said, the key reason I think this way is because most people are either frightened of code, or simply don’t know how to do it!

That’s why Muse is such a good software for anyone who wants to build a website without any knowledge of HTML or CSS. Unlike a software I’ll mention later in this list, this is the go-to app for anyone looking to get started on designing websites, putting their look before their practicality.

No.9 – Lightroom

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I’ve personally tried using Lightroom a handful of times, and I have to be honest, I can’t work it out for love or money. However, this is a software designed for photographers, as opposed to graphic designers, and most of the friends I have in the photography business wouldn’t know how to cope without this app.

From what I’ve seen, it’s a great tool for cropping and colourising multiple photos, as well as organising groups of similar photos into catalogues.

It might not be the most well-known of softwares, but if you’ve ever looked at a photo collection, don’t be surprised if Lightroom was a key tool used in choosing and refining those pictures you love.

No.8 – Audition

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This is the only one of Adobe CC’s softwares to be designed exclusively for sound-design, making this the primary software for musicians and sound-effects artists.

I’d love to brag about what wonderful things Audition can do, but seeing as the most I’ve ever done on it is an attempt to remove the background music from one song, I’m certainly not the person to ask.

Just be rest-assured that if you’re into the art of sound, Audition is a good software too pick.

No.7 – After Effects

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After Effects is the best place to go for special-effects when using the Adobe CC package, especially those which involve using 2 pieces of footage in one shot. Therefore, just about any hologram, motion-graphic, or chroma-key (i.e. blue/green screen) effect you see in a movie or TV show today would have been achieved using After Effects.

Some advanced examples of how After Effects can be used include the ‘helmet’ shots in the Iron Man films, and the fan-made opening titles to The Walking Dead. But some more subtle uses of After Effects include the Idents and used by news-corporations, such as the BBC and Sky News.

Really, all you need to do to see what great work can come from After Effects is turn the TV on.

No.6 – InDesign

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You’d be hard-pressed to find a design company these days that doesn’t use InDesign. Much like Microsoft Word, this software is designed for text-editing and publishing. Despite the fact that Word is cheeper and more functional for the everyman, InDesign is easily the industry standard in publishing design.

Not only does InDesign it easier to control the leading, tracking, indents, paragraph spaces, etc. which make typography work, but it’s also easier to create drop-caps, create page spreads, and seamlessly combine multiple documents into a whole book.

It can also be good for website design, but if you ask me, there’s still one software more iconic and capable for designing websites to wait for…

No.5 – Illustrator

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Contrary to what you might think from the software’s name, Illustrator is in fact a highly adaptable software for any creative working in the digital arts. In many respects, Illustrator is a superior software to the number one on this list, since it allows someone to design using vectors (solid shapes) as opposed to bitmaps (pixels). This allows for shapes to be more adaptable, curvatures to be smoother, and outlines to look crisper.

From t-shirts to typefaces, from leaflets to logos, and from maps to mascots, there’s an awful lot one can design simply using Illustrator.

It might take some time for someone to get used to bezier arms and the pen tool. Yet personally, this is my favourite of the Adobe CC Package, and I won’t stop using it anytime soon.

No.4 – Premiere Pro

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One of the problems with After Effects is that it takes a long time to load each one of its frames as you test your footage, making it painful for basic video editing. This is why Premiere pro is there better software to use for editing.

I have to be honest and say that I’ve never used this software myself, but from what I can tell, it’s more stripped down than After Effects is, and capable of loading its clips faster. This allows editors to slice away all they like, often creating masterpieces of film.

And if you think this is a software just for the general public, think again. The Sundance Film Festival saw a 130% rise in entries that were cut using Premiere Pro in 2015. Gone Girl, the first ever movie to be edited entirely with Premiere Pro, would not be the same if it weren’t for the Creative Cloud!

No.3 – Dreamweaver

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This software is designed with one thing in mind… development. Whether that be a website, a software, or an app, this is the go-to software for coders.

One part WYSIWYG, one part text-editor, it makes it easier than ever for developers to create sites using this software. Not only can the developer see a near-perfect replica of what they’re creating as they build it, but pre-built templates and segments help the professionals get the divs they want in their sites, and then use their knowledge of code to tweak their sites to be just the way they want them!

For every website created with WordPress, just about every other website would have been created with Dreamweaver. And once you get the hang of it, you can certainly tell why.

No.2 Flash (soon to be re-named ‘Animate’)

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Web-designers typically hate this software, because it’s tendency for slow loading times-and overly complicated UI’s meant hundreds of websites created in the early naughties were butchered.

On the other hand, this is the ideal software for animators and game-designers, especially those who like to keep their work 2D. Not only are the transitions crisp and smooth due to easing, but by adding some ActionScript, it can become entertainingly interactive.

Even if Flash games have fallen out of popularity with the rise of Apple devices, it’s popularity in cartoons like The Tom and Jerry Show show that Flash still has a bright, animated future.

Now, I would usually write a list of honourable mentions for this segment. However, since the majority of apps left in the Adobe CC package are used in the background, it seems rather pointless to make a huge fuss about them. So, let’s just skip to my number one pick…

No.1 – Photoshop

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Sure, InDesign and Illustrator might be the better softwares for graphic designers like myself. But seriously, how can anybody deny the sheer influence that Photoshop has had on both the creative and technological industries?!

Designed especially for photo-manipulation, such as the artwork by Erik Johansson, photoshop isn’t just the software most of us digital-creatives are introduced to. It’s a trademark which has become a verb in its own right, which if you ask me, stapes this as the most iconic the Adobe Creative Suite softwares!

(Sorry, I couldn’t help but include this video too!)

But, perhaps you have a different idea of which one of the Adobe CC Apps is the most iconic. If you think this list needs a different order, feel free to comment below and let me know!

Why I Love ‘Design Swansea’ Meet-Ups

I was absolutely gutted last week when I missed a‘Design Swansea’ meet-up for the first time. Ever since I first learnt about them, I’ve attended every single month. It’s just a shame that the date of this months clashed with pre-booked events.

So, to make up for it, I thought this’d be a good time to explain why I love going to these meet-ups. Furthermore, it might be nice to give you, my readers, an insight into why going to any sort of meet-up is worth the journey.

I Always Learn Something New.

Every time I attend, I always make sure to bring something I can write on. There are so many new things I can learn, and perhaps even research into further, I just need something to get it all down on. I find it hard to think of a presentation I’ve seen which I didn’t find to be worth listening to in one way or another, which shows you just how intriguing they are.

After all, my blog post before this one was actually inspired by a statistic that was mentioned in one the talks I listened to. He might have talked at the speed of lightning, but, hey, he’s a highly enjoyable character, and it allows me to practice my short-hand!

I Can Get Some Free Advice.

Nobody is perfect at their profession. Even those who are most dedicated to their work can either make a mistake or just not know where to go. So, it only makes sense, for when someeone in a profession like mine gets stuck, to turn to someone I can trust for advice.

These meet-ups are fantastic places for that. I was struggling one time to get a piece of HTML right, and after a short conversation with Gareth Evans (who I believe also designed the meet-up logo), I asked him if he could think of where the problem was from the screenshot I showed him. Kindly, he offered me some advice as to what the correct code to enter was. If I didn’t meet him at this meet up, I’d still be struggling right now.

I Can Get Away from the Computer.

This isn’t just a concern for graphic designers, as at least half of all jobs now requite some sort of computer work. And even if you’re on that computer doing a job you enjoy, it’s hardly ideal to be stuck in front of a screen, day in and day out, for the rest of your life.

That’s why it’s nice to have an event for us designers to go to where we can break the deadly cycle and actually interact with others. We can talk about how we’re doing in life, and as mentioned earlier, we can bounce both advice, and opinions, off one another.

It Allows for a Friendly Rivalry.

Seeing as the majority of us are either freelancers or working for rival companies, it can be easy for us to start bearing grudges against one another. After all, business is based on competition. With that said, it’s always wise to avoid making enemies as much as possible, since the majority of job opportunities come from those we know.

That’s why it’s good to have an environment were we can interact like this, because it shows that we’re comfortable with being where we are and not fussed as to whether we’re better or worse than any of our competitors. Nobody goes to these meet-ups just to wine and moan, we all go to to just relax and talk about the jobs we love doing.

I Can Be Myself.

I know it’s a cliched thing to say, but I can really be myself. These meet-ups are far less restrained than an office would be, not requiring me to conform to a dress code or work to a deadline. Plus, I don’t just have to talk about graphic things. The first day I ever went there, I spent a whole hour just talking to Gemma Williams about what kind of films we enjoyed.

And why is it good to be myself at a place like this? Because by showing the kind of person I am, it helps me to befriend those who share the same love for the design industry that I have.

And A Bonus… Free Pizza!

Hey, you can’t really go wrong with that!

What Makes ‘Thunderbirds Are Go!’ a Practically Perfect Reboot?

I would start this post by telling you when the release date for the second half of Series 1 of ‘Thunderbirds Are Go!’ is, except ITV seem to be keeping it a tightly graded secret. They’ve said it’s supposed to be sometime this month, yet exactly when this month they plan to release it is a mystery.

Nevertheless, there’s never a bad time to tell my watchers just how good this show is, especially since it’s one of my favourite shows. It shouldn’t be long before they announce the release date, so let’s take an in-depth look at what makes this show F.A.B.

It Knows What to Update…

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As with any adaptation, there are countless changes which need to me made. One of the most notable updates in ‘Thunderbirds Are Go!’ is that there are far more stronger female characters than before. The original did have the smart and elegant Lady Penelope, but it also had Tin Tin. Although far from a bad character, in the end, she was little more than a damsel in distress. She’s since been replaced by Kayo, whose got 100 times more spirit than her predecessor, as well as a genuinely interesting back-story relating to the shows main villain, The Hood.

There are other things which have been updated too. The island looks a little less 60’s, the FaceTime screens have been replaced with holograms, the Thunderbirds themselves have updated looks and functionalities, and Brains has become British-Indian. All of these little changes help to not only make the show individual, but also make it better.

…But It Doesn’t Lose Its Nostalgia.

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There are some things from the original show which simply can’t be replaced (some would argue that puppets should have still been used, but we’ll get to that later). From the opening “5…4…3…2…1…” titles, to the enhanced launch sequences of each Thunderbird, to the catchphrases and technical jargon, just about everything which fans of the old show love shows up in some way, shape or fom in the reboot, as well as a few sneaky Easter eggs from other Gery Anderson productions (hence ‘Stingray’ being John’s favourite TV show).

The writers clearly did their homework on the old series too. They might have made some changes to the plot, the most notable one being Jeff Tracy being a missing person instead of the leader of I.R. But, on the whole, the story, characters and format take clear influence from the original show. Perhaps the makers of ‘Catwoman’ (2004) should take notes.

It’s a Case-Study for When Practical and C.G.I. Effects Should be Used.

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It’s ironic that arguably the most iconic thing about the original series was the thing it’s creator hated the most; the puppets. Gery Anderson mastered the scale models with impressive designs and even more impressive destructions. When they were destroyed, they had a genuine impact on the sheer basis that you could feel the weight and scale of these explosions.

The same can’t really be said for the puppets, since Anderson himself hated how stiff and clumsily handled they were. That’s the advantage that C.G.I. has, especially when motion capture is used. Body parts which move more swiftly than before, faces with added emotion, and taking away the need to film real hands for close-up shots add life to the characters.

Furthermore, when you have Weta, the team behind the effects in the ‘Lord of the Rings’ franchise, taking charge if the effects, you can bet that the balance of practical and computer effects will be done to the highest possible standard. Seriously the characters look like puppets with added life!

It Takes a Few Risks.

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When a creative is willing to break a few rules, it makes their project far more exciting to create, purely because no one knows whether or not it would pay off. It was a risk for the crew to re-design all of the machines, especially Thunderbird 5 which looks practically nothing like the original. It was a risk for them to introduce Grandma Tracy, whose most memorable feature is being a dreadful cook. It was a risk for them to make Alan a 16-year-old who rides a space-board as opposed to your usual jet-pack.

Yet, if you ask me, all of these risks do in fact pay off. They give us viewers something new to chew on whilst watching the show, and make us look at the franchise in a different light. I adore the new look of T5, I find it hilarious how oblivious Grandma is to how terrible she actually is at cooking, and, good lord, I want to ride a surf-board in space!

It’s More Merchendisable Than Before.

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When I first saw the new logo, I practically fell in love with it! The diagonal type and enlarged ‘Thunderbirds’ felt reminiscent of the original logo, yet the sans-serif font and sneaky ligature which creates the ‘I.R.’ initials within the same logo made me know instantly that the adaptability of this logo was going to make way for great branding.

You have your classic costumes, figurines and model Tracy Island, but it’s the packaging design which is what makes these toys so inviting. The logo can be used on the packaging in a more vectorised way than in the opening titles, and yet still clearly represent the franchise. Plus, the bold colour palette of night blue and the 5 key colours of the Thunderbirds, as well as the more print-friendly profile images of the Tracy’s (as opposed to the seperstely illustrated profiles used in the 1960’s) make the brand look ready for the toy shop!

Isn’t There Anything Wrong With It?

If I did have to nit-pick, I would say that I’d prefer it if each episode was a tad longer. I think it was right for the team to shorten the episodes since the music is suspenseful and children generally enjoy shorter shows. Yet, at the same time, each episode does seem to go in the blink of an eye, and I find myself at the end of most episodes crying “is it over already?!” With that said, I suppose that’s a good complaint to have. It just shows you how much I enjoy the show whilst watching it!

Summary

On the whole, though, this show is a my prime example of how to make a reboot the right way. It’s got a style which brings in the best of both worlds, it keeps me on the edge of my seat from start to finish, and it’s genuinely well-written stories make me excited to tune in every morning for the next episode.

‘Thunderbirds Are Go!’? I couldn’t have put it better myself!